10 prevalent myths about English teaching – part 1

Reflecting English

myths-intro
Images: @jasonramasami

I have recently been putting the finishing touches to the first draft of my forthcoming book, Making Every English Lesson Count. The book will look at how the six principles that Shaun Allison and I explored in Making Every Lesson Count – challenge, explanation, modelling, practice, feedback and questioning – can improve the teaching of English. It will also challenge some of the myths I have heard (andhave believed) about English teaching. Most of these are not myths in the purest sense; they are partial-truths that canlimit our practice if we are not mindful of them.

I am also aware thatthese might seem likea series of straw man arguments. I do not think for one moment that experienced and skilled English teachers seriously believe in them. Nevertheless, I have heard each of them referred to – implicitly or explicitly – at some time or other. Think of the…

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