I tried that and it didn’t work . . . | thinkreadtweet

Education has a reputation for being subject to fads, where new ideas are adopted and then dropped. It seems to me that this is not so much because teachers are lazy, but because we are so enthusiastic, and always eager for new ways to help our students. Approaches that we think ‘work’, we keep in our arsenal, while we discard those that ‘don’t work’.

There is always the next new thing. We had Brain Gym, VAK, and NLP. We had versions of AfL that reduced it to lolly sticks and endless ‘dialogue’ marking. More lately we’ve had grit, growth mindset, and mindfulness. We have cold calling,…

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Time For Reflection: The Three Major Approaches Teachers Take To Teaching Writing & Their Limitations. | literacyforpleasure

This article is written with the intention to inform and provide interested parties with the opportunity for reflection.

In his book Growth Through English, John Dixon discusses the three common ‘types’ of writing teaching: skills, book planning/novel study and personal and community growth. 

1.Skills

A skills approach to teaching writing focuses on the learning of:
correct spelling,
cursive handwriting,
vocabulary,
correct grammar usage
comprehending the use of longer and more complex sentence structures.

We may recognise this as matching the current requirements of the National…

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Our Most Popular Blog-Posts All In One Place | literacyforpleasure

We appreciate your feedback about the website. Some of you have said it is quite hard to find what you are looking for. Therefore we have placed all our most popular blog posts here. Enjoy!

Reading:
Why Children Should Be Encouraged To Only Ever Use Phonics As A Helpful Friend.
Want To Make Reading Friends & Influence People? Use This Reading For Pleasure Article
Changing DEAR For The Better: Reflecting On This Term’s Reading
Parent & TA Guide To Listening To Reading & Making Comments
The Four Week Reading Programme
The Year 5 ‘Rights Of A Child Reader’ Guide.

Teaching…

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I tried that and it didn’t work . . . | thinkreadtweet

Education has a reputation for being subject to fads, where new ideas are adopted and then dropped. It seems to me that this is not so much because teachers are lazy, but because we are so enthusiastic, and always eager for new ways to help our students. Approaches that we think ‘work’, we keep in our arsenal, while we discard those that ‘don’t work’.

There is always the next new thing. We had Brain Gym, VAK, and NLP. We had versions of AfL that reduced it to lolly sticks and endless ‘dialogue’ marking. More lately we’ve had grit, growth mindset, and mindfulness. We have cold calling,…

Continue reading at:
http://ift.tt/2vrJj4y

Creating A Framework For Writing Progression | literacyforpleasure

The concern for the markable, is the chief reason for the continuance of that ‘other version’ of English whose constituent parts are grammar, spellings, comprehension, exercises, etc. It soon builds into a self-sufficient subject with its own techniques, tests, attendants, and its own mind… John Dixon Growth In English (p.92)

If your evaluation is narrow and mechanical, this is what the curriculum will be – John Dixon Growth In English (p.92)

The STA’s writing assessment framework for Key Stage Two doesn’t appear to be working. Procedures, such as the ones endorsed by the STA and ones…

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Time For Reflection: The Three Major Approaches Teachers Take To Teaching Writing & Their Limitations. | literacyforpleasure

This article is written with the intention to inform and provide interested parties with the opportunity for reflection.

 

In his book Growth Through English, John Dixon discusses the three common ‘types’ of writing teaching: skills, book planning/novel study and personal and community growth. 

1.Skills

A skills approach to teaching writing focuses on the learning of:
correct spelling,
cursive handwriting,
vocabulary,
correct grammar usage
comprehending the use of longer and more complex sentence structures.

We may recognise this as matching the current requirements of the…

Continue reading at:
http://ift.tt/2tWXjp3